Document Directory

04 Feb 01 - CJD - British company could have exported Mad Cow disease across the world
04 Feb 01 - CJD - NHS faces £2 billion bill to stop CJD
04 Feb 01 - CJD - The "Mad Cow" Disease Has Not Been Traced In Greece
04 Feb 01 - CJD - Government and farmers agree to share BSE-costs
04 Feb 01 - CJD - France's Glavany wants EU farm subsidies to target food safety
04 Feb 01 - CJD - German beef cull meets its match in a calf called Joan
04 Feb 01 - CJD - Inspection pledge following beef alerts
04 Feb 01 - CJD - Mad Cow ban likely to widen
04 Feb 01 - CJD - No Evidence Of Mad Cow Disease Found In Imported Feed
04 Feb 01 - CJD - Govt to ban 'Mad Cow' beef imports
04 Feb 01 - CJD - More Brazilian beef products banned
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Hunt for calf evading BSE slaughter
03 Feb 01 - CJD - BSE calf on the run
03 Feb 01 - CJD - More beef seized in BSE checks
03 Feb 01 - CJD - EU commission proposes additional 971 million euro for BSE crisis
03 Feb 01 - CJD - EU considers asking member states for monthly reports on BSE controls
03 Feb 01 - CJD - BSE panic hits cosmetic lip injections
03 Feb 01 - CJD - New alert over German beef imports
03 Feb 01 - CJD - BSE beef Seized In Hampden Park
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Spinal cord found in German beef
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Cows of all ages are vulnerable to slaughter in Germany
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Mad Cow crisis reaches Vatican dinner tables
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Latin American seek ban to prevent Mad Cow disease
03 Feb 01 - CJD - 'Mad Cow' tests being carried out on apes
03 Feb 01 - CJD - 'Depressed' wife had vCJD, inquest told
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Mexico Expects to Ban Brazil beef on Mad Cow Fear
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Canada Bans Brazil beef Imports on Mad Cow Fears
03 Feb 01 - CJD - U.S. Bans Brazil beef Imports on Mad Cow Fears
03 Feb 01 - CJD - Germany's Mad Cow laboratory



04 Feb 01 - CJD - British company could have exported Mad Cow disease across the world

Staff Reporter

Sunday Times- Sunday 4 February 2001


A British company could have exported Mad Cow disease across the world. Whitehall documents reveal that as many as 70 countries received protein potentially contaminated with BSE that may then have been fed to their cattle.

The protein for animal feed was exported despite the fact that it had been banned for use with sheep and cattle in Britain in 1988, when it was identified by the government as the most likely cause of BSE.

The United Nations has now warned that all countries that imported the protein, in the form of meat and bone meal, are at risk of harbouring BSE - the most likely cause of vCJD in humans.

The main British producer of potentially contaminated meat and bone meal (MBM) was Prosper de Mulder, Britain's largest rendering company, which processes by-products such as offal and carcasses unfit for human consumption. Anthony de Mulder, who runs the business, with a turnover of more than £120m a year, has a family fortune of £70m, according to The Sunday Times Rich List.

The Doncaster-based company was the main exporter of MBM after it was banned for use in cattle and sheep feed in July 1988. It remained legal to export it for use in pig and poultry feed.

At first, it was shipped largely to western Europe but, when European Union members began to ban imports in 1990 amid concerns about the spread of BSE, the firm switched exports to countries outside the EU.

Figures obtained from customs show that more than 200,000 tons of pig and poultry feed, including MBM, were exported to 70 countries between 1988 and 1996, when its worldwide export from Britain was finally banned by the EU because of the BSE threat.

The figures do not specify how much of this feed was MBM, but Prosper de Mulder estimates that it would have been up to half. Research has shown that infected material the size of just one peppercorn could transmit BSE to a cow.

The main importers outside Europe include Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Kenya, Lebanon, Malta, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan and Thailand.

From the analysis of the exports, Andrew Speedy, a senior UN officer, warned that the Middle East, eastern Europe and north Africa have the highest risk of harbouring Mad Cow disease. A statement from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation urged all countries that have imported cattle or MBM from western Europe, especially Britain, to be concerned about the risk of BSE, and vCJD.

The latest development could prompt compensation claims from the countries affected. Already, in France, lawyers for two of the three victims who have died from vCJD are bringing a legal action accusing the British government and EU officials of poisoning and manslaughter. Britain exported 15,000 tons of MBM to France between 1988 and 1990.

Official figures suggest 1,200 cattle have been infected with BSE in France though it may be as high as 7,300 because of the failure of farmers to report cases.

Germany has also reported a sharp rise in BSE, forcing the mass slaughter of 400,000 cattle in a bid to restore public confidence in the beef market. Italy has also reported its first case of BSE in the past month.

The growing crisis has led to the re-importing of meat potentially infected with BSE to Britain. banned spinal material has been found in imported beef from Germany and Ireland.

This weekend Britain's Food Standards Agency asked the EU to take urgent action to ensure no further breaches.

Britain's exporting of MBM up to 1996 was allowed despite warnings from the government's chief medical officer that it would be "short-sighted" and would leave Britain open to criticism that it was introducing BSE into other countries' food chains.

He was overruled, however, by agriculture ministry advisers who said that any attempt to ban exports would be challenged in the courts by Britain's animal feed suppliers.

Paul Foxcroft, the sales and marketing director for Prosper de Mulder, admitted the firm was the main MBM exporter, and insisted that the countries were aware it was suitable only for use in pig and poultry food. Inspectors only later discovered cattle feed could be cross-contaminated with pig and poultry feed, he said.

However, he conceded it was "quite possible" that MBM ex-ported by his firm was ultimately responsible for cases of BSE worldwide.

"Twenty-twenty hindsight is a wonderful thing," said Foxcroft. "In 1988, nobody had any idea of the seriousness of BSE."

- Britain will have to pay up to £300m to the EU to fund the slaughter, storage and incineration of what could be as many as 8m cows across the Continent, at a cost of £6 billion.

UK CUSTOMS FEED EXPORT FIGURES

 
Country 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996
Abu Dhabi               1  
Australia                 0
Austria           12 1   24
Bangladesh               1  
Belgium 274 1,605 1,131 740 13 1 42 24 309
Br Ind Oc Terr         105   645    
Brazil                  
Brunei             20    
Bulgaria               22  
Burma               15  
Canada           30 22 31 42
Canary Islands         11        
Cayman Islands                 86
Chile                  
China               108 237
Colombia         21        
Curucao   1              
Cyprus           230 0 6  
Czech Republic               2  
Denmark   60 34 248 180        
Egypt                  
Falkland Islands                 1
Faroe Islands               14 162
Finland         21 10 29   23
France 7,222 15,674 1,148 20 94   156 802 455
Germany 559 578 14 5 5 5 0 23 0
Ghana 16     6          
Gibralter     5            
Greece             101 148  
Haiti           108      
Hong Kong             237 3  
Hungary       48 133 246 30 498 367
Iceland       48 133 246 30 498 367
Indonesia       2,020 14,047 20,339 14,573 8,508 6,904
Iran     20         0 0
Irish Republic 2,555 900 234 485 232 279 356 400 1,745
Israel 92 2,718 3,677 9,816 7,265 4,008 1,486 945 447
Italy 38 89 130 128 139 1,785 456 883 566
Japan     132 62 43 31 64 0 1
Jordan         50 231 212 107  
Kenya   342 100       1   381
Lebanon 60 80     175 99      
Liberia   3              
Liechtenstein                  
Lithuania                  
Malawi         21        
Malaysia     19       20 0  
Malta 299 220 267 182 119 58 40 43 23
Mayotte       11          
Morocco                 525
Namibia                  
Netherlands 1,826 6,099 7,380 1,089 814 156 1,223 3,445 2,130
Nigeria   100         2    
Norway       11 37 144 5 3 7
Pakistan               43  
Papua New Guinea                  
Philippines         145 105 733 482 553
Pitcairn                  
Poland             55 122  
Portugal 80     6         44
Romania               466  
Russia               453 2,646
Saudi Arabia 5 3,462 357         80  
Sierra Leone           280 129 2  
Singapore       801         687
South Africa 5 50       0      
South Korea     1 220 1,010 103   20  
Spain         18   10 36 202
Sri Lanka 121 20   693 1,242 1,417      
Sweden 76   652 6   64 6    
Switzerland     0         218 0
Taiwan   200 1,143 2,023 280 87   42 823
Tajikistan                  
Tanzania                 0
Thailand     1,574 6,239 4,408 2,157 1,688 1,184 1,309
Togo         10        
Tunisia                  
Turkey       380     6    
U.S. Oceania             43    
U.S. Virgin Is.                  
U.S.A.   20             0
Vietnam                  
Lesotho                  
Sharjah etc.                  
Grand Total 13,228 32,220 17,998 25,259 30,615 32,005 22,387 19,179 20,698



04 Feb 01 - CJD - NHS faces £2 billion bill to stop CJD

Jonathan Leake, Science Editor

Sunday Times- Sunday 4 February 2001


The NHS faces a multi-billion-pound bill to combat the risk of patients contracting vCJD, the human form of Mad Cow disease, from surgery.

An unpublished government report from last autumn warns that surgeons could spread vCJD unless there is a switch to disposable instruments for many operations. Alan Milburn, the health secretary, has said he will publish it - but will not say when.

Health ministers have already ordered single-use instruments for tonsillectomies at a cost of £25m, and £200m is being spent on improving sterilisation procedures.

The risk assessment report, commissioned by the Department of Health and SEAC, the government's scientific advisory committee on BSE and CJD, says disposable instruments are also needed for operations ranging from appendectomies to brain and eye surgery, because of the resilience of prions, the infective agent that causes the disease. They can survive temperatures higher than 500C. Instruments are generally sterilised at 120C.

Professor Peter Smith, acting chairman of SEAC, said: "If there is a risk of transmission of vCJD through tonsillectomy instruments, I think it is likely that there is risk through other surgical procedures - particularly those involving the brain and central nervous system."

Civil servants have calculated the cost of introducing disposable instruments at more than £630m a year, including £24m for appendectomies, £7m for lymph biopsies; £38m for neurosurgery; and £567m for eye surgery.

The relatively high cost for opthalmic surgery is because of the complexity and cost of the equipment used, such as specialised microscopes and micro-surgery instruments.

Those costs could rise even further, depending on how fast vCJD spreads. Medical experts say that if other operations such as abdominal surgery are added to the list of those where instruments can be used just once, the cost might exceed £2 billion, about 4% of the NHS's annual budget of £50 billion.

Tomorrow, new monthly figures will show another sharp rise in the total number of known or suspected victims from 88 to 94, while those involved in monitoring the disease say investigations are under way into other cases that will bring the total to 100 within weeks.

Compared with other causes of death this figure remains tiny - but the threat of vCJD lies in the fact that 1m infected cattle entered the human food chain and the incubation period could be as long as 40 years, so tens of thousands of people may eventually be killed by it.

All these future victims could theoretically transmit the disease if they give blood or have operations while unknowingly incubating the disease.

So far there have been no known cases where vCJD was transmitted by surgery, but such risks are well documented in related forms of the disease such as sporadic CJD, which occurs naturally in humans.

In one of the worst cases in 1976, Dr Christopher Bernoulli, a Swiss neurosurgeon, reported that two of his patients had died of CJD. The source was found to be two electrodes that he had inserted into the brain of a third patient. The original operation was done in 1974, but the instruments had remained infective despite repeated sterilisation.

The health department has set aside £30m for prion research, but a programme to study whether instruments can transmit disease has been delayed. It was supposed to start two years ago, when the Medical Research Council recruited Professor Charles Weissman from Zurich University. It came to a halt, however, when Weissman found there was nowhere to keep the 3,000-5,000 mice he needed for the project.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - The "Mad Cow" Disease Has Not Been Traced In Greece

Staff Reporter

Macedonian Press Agency - Sunday 4 February 2001


The lab tests that were conducted in Greece in the month of January concluded that the "Mad Cow" disease is not traced in the country. The above were stated by Greek minister of agriculture Giorgos Anomeritis on the occasion of his visit to the 17th AGROTICA agricultural sector exhibition in Thessaloniki.

Mr. Anomeritis stated that there are two basic factors that have essentially saved the Greek beef production. The first one is the fact that the disease usually appears in animals over the age of 30 months when in Greece cattle are slaughtered before they reach the 17th month of their lives. Also, another factor is that of the 1.650.000 tons of animal feed used in Greece only 30.000-35.000 tons are meat-and-bone meals.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - Government and farmers agree to share BSE-costs

Staff Reporter

Norway Post - Sunday 4 February 2001


Norwegian farmers' unions and the Government have agreed on how to share the costs of measures taken to avoid the introduction of BSE into Norway.

The extraordinary costs are calculated to NOK 100 million, and the agreement covers NOK 85 million, while the farmers must cover NOK 15 million of the costs.

Of the NOK 85 million, 43 million will come from an increase of prices to the customer on eggs, poultry and pork. The rest, 42 million will come from government funds.

The agreement is a compromise, as the farmers had originally asked for NOK 135 million, while the Government's offer was 75 million. The farmers were also of the opinion that all extra costs should be covered through funds from the National budget, but this was not accepted.

Head of Norway's Association for Women and Family, Elisabeth Rusdal says it is unreasonable that consumers should help pay for the measures against BSE.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - France's Glavany wants EU farm subsidies to target food safety

Ananova

PA News- Sunday 4 February 2001


PARIS (AFX) - The BSE crisis should be seen as "an opportunity to redirect European agricultural subsidies," said Jean Glavany, the French Minister of Agriculture in an interview on French radion station RTL.

Glavany said the only way for the European Union to "devote money to improving food safety and tackle the "Mad Cow" crisis," was to redirect EU subsidies, "as European heads of state in Berlin have recently come out against an increase in European agricultural budgets."

"The mad race aimed at increasing productivity at all costs has reached the end of the road. We have to produce better rather than produce more, and that's why we have to redirect public subsidies, and the (BSE) crisis could provide the ideal excuse to do so," said Glavany.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - German beef cull meets its match in a calf called Joan

John Hooper in Berlin

Guardian- Sunday 4 February 2001


She is reddish-brown, with soft, melting eyes and an unsteady gait. By last night, she had become a symbol of German farmers' resistance to the mass slaughter of their cattle because of the growing crisis over Mad Cow disease.

Joan of Arc, as the farmers of Schleswig-Holstein have nicknamed her, is a new-born calf. Earlier this week, and in breach of all the rules, the regional agriculture minister, Rüdiger von Plüskow, gave in to a local farmer's entreaties and commuted her death sentence. Joan of Arc comes from a BSE-infected herd.

The minister seems not to have realised that the reprieve could invalidate measures being taken to combat BSE and cost it a ban on the export of its beef. By the time the implications became clear, however, Joan of Arc had been spirited away.

Last night, a nationwide calf hunt was under way and the authorities were threatening to cut off compensation for slaughtered animals unless Joan of Arc turned up.

The German government announced on Wednesday that it would slaughter an estimated 400,000 cattle in an attempt to curb Mad Cow disease. It was the most dramatic step in the fight against BSE since the first case was discovered in Germany last November.

The agriculture minister, Renate Künast, said it would cost some DM362m (£120m) to buy the cattle from farmers, slaughter them and dispose of the carcasses.

But in a departure from the guidelines, Mr von Plüskow said that Joan of Arc could be allowed to live as long as her mother did not test positive for the disease.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - Inspection pledge following beef alerts

By Andrea Babbington

Independent- Sunday 4 February 2001


The Food Standards Agency has pledged to carry on inspecting every single imported German beef carcass after banned material was found in two more consignments.

In a week of BSE control scares, spinal cord was twice found in German beef at a cutting plant in Eastbourne, East Sussex.

Meat inspectors were also continuing to examine a consignment of fore and hind quarters of beef delivered to a Northern Irish plant from the Republic of Ireland, which is thought to contain spinal cord or residual spinal cord.

A spokesman for the FSA said that every German carcass was being inspected, and the Eastbourne discoveries proved the controls were working.

The agency introduced the stringent checking regime on imported German beef after a first incident in Eastbourne on January 29 in which a two-inch piece of spinal cord was discovered in a hindquarter from a German supplier.

On Thursday, inspectors at the same East Sussex cutting plant discovered spinal material in one of 217 German beef hindquarters.

The beef, which was in breach of strict BSE controls, had been marked up as fit for human consumption, the Agency said.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - Mad Cow ban likely to widen

By Martin Johnston

News New Zealand Herald- Sunday 4 February 2001


A ban on beef products from Europe that New Zealand imposed because of mad-cow disease may be expanded to other high-risk exporters.

Government officials are investigating changes to the ban and will meet their Australian counterparts this week.

Mad-cow disease, or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), is thought to cause the rare but fatal brain-wasting illness new-variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans who eat infected beef.

More than 80 people in Europe have died from vCJD. There have been no New Zealand deaths.

The Australian and New Zealand bans on importing European beef products came into force last month, extending those imposed on British beef in 1996.

New Zealand's imports of beef or derivative products were small even before the ban.

Products the clampdown covers include salami, soup, canned food, sausage, gravy, sauce, stock and luncheon meat. The Australia New Zealand Food Standards Authority is considering a new standard under which all imports of beef or its derivative products would have to be certified free of BSE.

The authority's general manager, Ian Lindenmayer, said from Canberra yesterday that a certification system would rely on surveillance, and some countries took BSE risks more seriously than others.

The New Zealand Ministry of Health's chief medical adviser, Dr Colin Feek, said last night that New Zealand wanted the ban changed to a more targeted approach.

This might expand it to some non-European countries and lift it from some in the European Union.

Two North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta) members, Mexico and the United States, have temporarily banned imports of beef products from Brazil.

Nafta bans products from countries not recognised as BSE-free.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation has alerted all countries that have imported cattle or meat-and-bone meal animal feed from Western Europe, especially Britain, to be concerned about the risk of BSE.

Britain's Sunday Times reported that Prosper de Mulder, the main British producer of potentially contaminated meat-and-bone meal, exported to 70 countries from 1988 until a European Union ban in 1996.

The UN warns that the Middle East , eastern Europe and North Africa have the highest risk of harbouring mad-cow disease.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - No Evidence Of Mad Cow Disease Found In Imported Feed

By Lilian Wu

CNA - Sunday 4 February 2001


Taipei, Feb. 4 (CNA) The Council of Agriculture (COA) said Sunday that it has traced ground poultry powder imported from affected European countries and has found no evidence of the presence of Mad Cow disease in Taiwan.

The COA released the results of its investigation after recent reports in Europe said that many countries, including Taiwan, have imported the remains of affected beef and animal bone powder and were in danger of having cases of Mad Cow disease, or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), pop up in their backyards.

Lee Chin-lung, director of the COA's Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine, said that Taiwan has banned the importation of ground powder, beef bone powder, meat powder, stud beef, and stud sheep from affected European countries since 1990. Lee said that the council's most recent investigation showed that Taiwan did import three batches, or hundreds of tons of each batch of poultry powder, but not beef remains, from affected areas in Europe between 1990 and 1995.

Lee noted that the three batches of poultry powder were imported by a large domestic feed company and that the company had used the three batches for domestic fowl and maritime feed, adding that it has not used any of the powder as beef or sheep feed.

To avoid the possibility of the outbreak of Mad Cow disease, the bureau recently collected 820 cow brains from southern, central, and northern Taiwan to see if any had BSE, but it has so far not detected any such symptoms.

BSE was first detected in Britain in the late 1980s, and a growing number of cases of the disease have been reported in several European countries.

The spread of the disease is believed to be caused by grazing animals feeding on the ground-up remains of infected animals.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - Govt to ban 'Mad Cow' beef imports

Staff Reporter

Daily Yomiuri - Sunday 4 February 2001


To prevent the spread of a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry has announced that it will revise rules on the application of the Food Sanitation Law to ban imports of beef and beef products from cattle infected with so-called Mad Cow disease.

Mad Cow disease, or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), is a fatal brain-wasting illness that has been threatening the human food supply in European countries. Scientists believe the organism that causes BSE also causes new variant CJD, a human form of Mad Cow disease.

Under the current Food Sanitation Law, there are no regulations governing Mad Cow disease, meaning the ministry is limited to asking importers to voluntarily stop imports of beef or beef products potentially infected with BSE.

The law bans the import and sale of livestock meat and bones potentially infected with parasites and specified diseases, not including Mad Cow disease. The ministry said it would add the disease to the list stipulated in the law.

The revised regulations will also prohibit imports of ham, gelatin and other processed meat products potentially infected with the disease. Cattle brains, spinal cords and other body parts considered to pose a high risk of spreading CJD if eaten will be deemed organs and banned if they are infected with BSE.

However, food supplements, soup and other processed products made from beef will be subject to importers' self-imposed regulations as before.

Under the revised rules, the ministry will oblige beef-exporting countries to prove their products are free from Mad Cow disease. However, it will impose a ban on imports of beef and beef products from European Union member countries for the time being, even if they are certified as disease-free.

In January, the Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Ministry banned imports of beef from European Union countries in accordance with the Domestic Animal Infectious Diseases Control Law. However, the law regulates mainly imports of meat and fails to cover cattle bones or additives and other products made from the bones that are destined for human consumption.


04 Feb 01 - CJD - More Brazilian beef products banned

Staff Reporter

CBC- Sunday 4 February 2001


OTTAWA - The Canadian Food Inspection Agency added three more products to the list of banned beef products from Brazil, because of concern over Mad Cow disease.

Canadian officials say there's no proof Brazilian cattle have Mad Cow disease, but the ban is a precautionary step.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, or BSE, is known to attack the central nervous system of cattle, making them unco-ordinated.

Its human equivalent, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is a fatal brain illness.

So far, 80 people in Britain and three in France have died from the disease. There are no cases of BSE in Canada.

Any Brazilian beef already on store shelves are being recalled. That includes products such as canned corned beef and beef extracts.

In a news release late Saturday, the agency added Palace corned beef, Phoenicia corned beef and Pampeano beef extract to the ban list.

Also on Saturday, Mexico joined Canada and the U.S. in a temporary import ban on Brazilian beef products.

Canada is in the middle of a trade dispute with Brazil over aircraft industry subsidies but officials say that has nothing to do with the ban.

The food agency's concern was sparked by a World Food Organization report that said the spread of BSE beyond Europe was a real threat and that animal-based feed may have infected cattle in other countries.

Canadian officials were alarmed when Brazil admitted it had been importing animal-based feeds from Europe until 1999.

The Mad Cow scare has resurfaced in Europe. Germany, a country that had boasted that it was BSE-free, recently found 20 cases. It has decided to slaughter 400,000 cows.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Hunt for calf evading BSE slaughter

Staff Reporter

BBC- Saturday 3 February 2001


A search has been launched in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein for a new-born calf which escaped being killed under a BSE slaughter programme.

The tiny doe-eyed creature was -- against all the rules -- given a reprieve by the regional agriculture minister while its mother was tested for BSE, or Mad Cow disease.

But the animal disappeared after being seized by farmers opposed to the slaughter programme.

The authorities have now threatened to withhold from the owners all the compensation due for their slaughtered animals unless the calf is returned.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - BSE calf on the run

By Rob Broomby in Berlin

BBC- Saturday 3 February 2001


A search is under way in northern Germany for a newborn calf which managed to evade the BSE slaughter programme.

An extensive calf hunt swung into operation after farmers opposing the slaughter of a BSE-infected herd in northern Germany seized the doe-eyed animal en route to the abattoir and went to ground.

In breach of all the rules, a regional agriculture minister had given the photogenic tiny red calf an unofficial reprieve from its death sentence pending the outcome of a BSE test on its mother.

But the animal - dubbed Joan of Arc after the legendary medieval French farm girl turned warrior - is now on the run.

The bovine heroine has simply disappeared without so much as a hoofprint.

The authorities have stepped up the pressure on the owners of the fugitive creature by threatening to stop all compensation for the other slaughtered animals.

The fiasco now leaves the state of Schleswig Holstein facing the prospect of a beef export ban unless the slaughter is carried out in full.

There is no happy ending to the French legend of St Joan, but German farmers are convinced they have found a martyr to their cause.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - More beef seized in BSE checks

Staff Reporter

BBC- Saturday 3 February 2001


The Northern Ireland Food Standards Agency has seized another consignment of imported beef because it appears to contain material banned under anti-BSE controls.

The agency said the fore and hind beef quarters, imported from the Republic of Ireland, appeared to have spinal cord or residual spinal cord still attached.

The discovery was evidence that the surveillance programme was working, the agency said.

Under European and British regulations, all remnants of spinal cord are classified as specified risk material (SRM) and should be removed before export in new measures designed to ensure that no BSE-infected meat gets into the food chain.

The agency said it would not identify the meat plant in Northern Ireland where the Irish beef was to have been processed.

A spokesman said: "Many towns only have one plant so it would not be fair to name where it is.

"It is not the plant's fault if it receives banned material from abroad."

Other seizures

This is the second consignment of beef from the Irish Republic which has contained SRM.

Another batch of carcass meat was rejected by Northern Ireland officials in October last year.

And last month Northern Ireland BSE inspectors found spinal cord in beef forequarters imported from Germany at a Newry plant. That beef has now been returned to the country of origin.

Following the latest discovery, there have been renewed calls here for closer scrutiny of meat imports.

The Northern Ireland Livestock and Meat Commission has said the agency must examine the implementation of BSE controls in countries which ship meat to the UK.

There have been several other discoveries of SRM in batches of beef imported into the UK.

On Thursday inspectors in Eastbourne, England, found that a batch of imported German beef contained one hindquarter with spinal cord marked as fit for human consumption.

The accompanying documentation stated that the beef was from animals under 30 months old.

The find was made at the same cutting plant, which received a German hindquarter containing two inches of spinal cord on Monday.

The consignments were from different sources in Germany.

The Food Standards Agency started a 100% inspection of all imported German beef carcasses at licensed plants on 29 January.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - EU commission proposes additional 971 million euro for BSE crisis

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


BRUSSELS (AFX) - The European Commission said it is proposing 971 million euro of additional spending in the 2001 EU budget, which was not foreseen when the 2001 budget was approved at the end of last year.

This supplementary and amending budget includes BSE spending to cover market support, the destruction of animals older than 30 months and extra co-financing for BSE tests, the commission said.

The additional budget must be approved by EU member states and the parliament, it said.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - EU considers asking member states for monthly reports on BSE controls

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


BRUSSELS (AFX) - EU Health and Consumer Protection Commissioner David Byrne said he is considering requiring all member states to report monthly on their implementation of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy control measures.

At present only the UK and Portugal file such reports, and Byrne said they had proven to be "invaluable" in ensuring compliance.

Byrne said BSE could have been curbed long ago if the 15 member states had applied EU regulations to the fullest.

"It is surely a matter of very great regret that this determination to tackle BSE has taken so long to emerge," he said.

"Member states (today) are prepared to accept virtually any measure to ensure that beef is now safe," he told the European Parliament. With the fear of BSE spreading across the continent, all EU member states are now insisting that they are giving "top priority" to implementing BSE-related measures, Byrne said. rom/kgd/cmr


03 Feb 01 - CJD - BSE panic hits cosmetic lip injections

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


A former German porn actress has said panic is gripping the celebrity circuit over fears that collagen injections could have been infected with BSE.

Actresses like Melanie Griffith, Goldie Hawn, Pamela Anderson and Cher have all reportedly had the lip injections to create a sexy pout.

Plastic surgeons in Europe have refused to rule out the possibility collagen injections which are made from cow skin could cause vCJD

Former actress Gina Wild, the German star of movies like The Dead Diver, said: "My lips are natural but I know lots of my colleagues in the erotic film business as well as serious movie stars have had collagen injections. Some of them are really scared now of BSE."


03 Feb 01 - CJD - New alert over German beef imports

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


Food inspectors have found banned material in two more consignments of beef imported into Britain.

The Food Standards Agency says inspectors have found spinal cord in a German beef delivered to a cutting plant in Eastbourne, East Sussex.

The beef, which was in breach of strict BSE controls, had been marked up as fit for human consumption, says the agency.

Inspectors are also examining part of a consignment of fore and hind quarters of beef delivered to a Northern Irish plant from the Republic of Ireland which the agency said appeared to contain spinal cord or residual spinal cord.

Under European and British regulations, all remnants of spinal cord is classified as specified risk material (SRM) and should be removed before export in new measures designed to ensure that no BSE-infected meat gets into the food chain.

The agency said the Eastbourne case was discovered yesterday after one of 217 beef hindquarters was found to contain spinal material.

It had been imported into the UK through Dover. Accompanying documentation said the beef complied with regulations stating that it came from animals under 30 months old.

It was the second time this week, said the agency, that banned material had been found in German beef delivered to the plant.

On Monday, a two-inch piece of spinal cord was discovered in a hindquarter from a different German supplier.

Last month, inspectors found banned spinal material in 41,000 kilos of German beef at two processing plants in Northern Ireland.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - BSE beef Seized In Hampden Park



Eastbourne Herald - Saturday 3 February 2001


Inspectors have seized a consignment of German imported beef which breaks anti-BSE laws, from a meat processing plant at Hampden Park.

The meat was found to contain remnants of spinal cord which breaches strict European Union directives brought about by the BSE crisis.

The meat was delivered to Anglo Dutch Meats on Monday after arriving at Dover and was due to be processed for wholesalers in this country and abroad.

ADM managing director Nik Askaroff said one of more than 200 carcasses was found to have a small section of spinal cord still attached. It measured two inches.

'It was discovered straight away by our technical staff at the plant and quarantined. We have a policy to inspect 100 per cent of the meat we receive here and I have every confidence in the safety of our products.'

The cord was among 19,000 kilos of meat from Oldenburg and was spotted by a vet from the Meat hygiene Service.

A spokesman for the Food Standards Agency said it was the second such finding in two weeks. The German supplier could now face a fine.

Yesterday, Mr Askaroff gave the go-ahead for the rest of the consignment to be processed at the plant in Arkwright Road.

'Consumers can have every confidence in beef because this proves the system is working and potentially contaminated beef is being picked out if it gets through.

'The onus has to be on our colleagues in Germany who have not spotted this. The onus is now on them to provide the proper checks. They are the ones who will now be penalised, not us.'

Under EU law brought in last October all traces of spinal chord must be removed from cattle more than a year old when slaughtered.

Earlier this month ADM was fined £6,000 for failing to comply with packaging waste regulations in a move which saved the firm £2,300. The firm admitted the offences but said it did not fully understand how the regulations applied to it. Magistrates also ordered ADM to pay £505 in legal costs.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Spinal cord found in German beef

Staff Reporter

BBC- Saturday 3 February 2001


A consignment of imported German beef has been found to contain banned spinal cord material - the third such incident in two weeks.

The latest breach of BSE controls was detected in beef imported through the port of Dover.

The discovery was made at a meat cutting plant in Eastbourne, Sussex - the same plant which on Monday was found to have received a consignment of beef containing two inches of spinal cord.

Inspectors are also examining part of a consignment of beef delivered to a Northern Irish plant from the Republic of Ireland, which the Food Standards Agency (FSA) said appeared to contain spinal cord or residual spinal cord.

An earlier seizure of German beef containing spinal cord was made in Newry in mid January.

Spinal cord is banned under strict European Union rules to combat BSE.

Following the earlier finds the FSA ordered UK meat hygiene inspectors to step up inspections of German beef imports.

Agency chairman Sir John Krebbs questioned how effectively the EU-wide controls were being enforced.

The contaminated carcasses discovered on Monday have since been destroyed.

New rules

Under European law introduced three months ago, spinal cord, which is on the list of specified risk material, must be removed from cattle aged over 12 months immediately after slaughter and destroyed.

Speaking after Monday's discovery Sir John said the second breach by Germany within two weeks was "totally unacceptable."

"It raises questions as to how effectively the EU-wide controls are being enforced.

"At the request of the FSA, the European Commission are already raising with the German authorities the need for them to fully comply with the controls."


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Cows of all ages are vulnerable to slaughter in Germany

By Rob Broomby in Berlin

BBC- Saturday 3 February 2001


A search is under way in northern Germany for a newborn calf which managed to evade the BSE slaughter programme.

An extensive calf hunt swung into operation after farmers opposing the slaughter of a BSE-infected herd in northern Germany seized the doe-eyed animal en route to the abattoir and went to ground.

In breach of all the rules, a regional agriculture minister had given the photogenic tiny red calf an unofficial reprieve from its death sentence pending the outcome of a BSE test on its mother.

But the animal - dubbed Joan of Arc after the legendary medieval French farm girl turned warrior - is now on the run.

The bovine heroine has simply disappeared without so much as a hoofprint.

The authorities have stepped up the pressure on the owners of the fugitive creature by threatening to stop all compensation for the other slaughtered animals.

The fiasco now leaves the state of Schleswig Holstein facing the prospect of a beef export ban unless the slaughter is carried out in full.

There is no happy ending to the French legend of St Joan, but German farmers are convinced they have found a martyr to their cause.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Mad Cow crisis reaches Vatican dinner tables

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


Europe's Mad Cow crisis has reached the Pope's dinner table, the pontiff's butcher says.

The Pope has a household staff of Polish nuns who do the shopping, make up the menu and cook for the Polish-born pontiff.

"Last week red meat was on the list, this week it wasn't," says butcher Giulio Lucarelli.

Mr Lucarelli holds the meat concession at the Vatican supermarket, supplying Vatican officials as well as John Paul.

In general, Mr Lucarelli said, the purchase of red meat has gone down at the Vatican as a result of the Mad Cow scare but "not as sharply as elsewhere in Italy".

Customers are buying pork and chicken in place of beef.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Latin American seek ban to prevent Mad Cow disease

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


Livestock inspectors in Mexico and Central America are calling for a ban on meat products from Europe over fear of BSE.

The inspectors said they would recommend blocking more than 53 different products.

Officials from Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, Costa Rica and Panama attended the meeting.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - 'Mad Cow' tests being carried out on apes

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


German scientists are feeding brains from British cows to apes to find out more about the effect on humans of eating BSE-infected meat.

The experiments are being conducted at the Goettingen Primate Institute where 80 apes are being fed the material.

brain and spinal cord material is banned from the human food chain because of fears that it leads to the human version of Mad Cow disease.

Scientists are unsure how the disease is passed from cows to humans and say the experiments are to find out how much of the risky material an ape must eat to develop the primate version of the disease.

They are working with scientists in France, Italy and Sweden on the research project.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - 'Depressed' wife had vCJD, inquest told

Ananova

PA News- Saturday 3 February 2001


A woman thought to be severely depressed was dying of the human form of Mad Cow disease, an inquest has heard.

Karen Beavon, 37, a software teacher from the Vale of Glamorgan, started to become depressed around Christmas 1999 - about the time she and her husband Nigel were trying for a baby.

Cardiff Coroner Dr Lawrence Addicott recorded a verdict of death by misadventure from variant-Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, the human form of BSE.

Mr Beavon told the court: "Just before Christmas she started to get a bad back, depressed and anxious and was convinced she could not be healthy."

Mrs Beavon was admitted to the psychiatric unit of the University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff.

After going back home, Mrs Beavon's mother moved in with her son-in-law to help him look after her daughter.

"Between the two of us we were providing 24-hour care. No-one from social services crossed our door to tell us what we should do.

"We did not know what we were doing," Mr Beavon said.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Mexico Expects to Ban Brazil beef on Mad Cow Fear



NorthJersey.com- Saturday 3 February 2001


MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico was on the verge of banning Brazilian beef products on Friday -- together with its NAFTA partners Canada and the United States -- in a continued effort to protect the nation against Mad Cow disease, said an agricultural official.

Mexican Director of Animal Health Juan Garza Ramos told Reuters in an interview that the country would impose the ban because certain Brazilian beef products are believed to have come into contact with European beef, where cases of Mad Cow disease are most common.

``We are waiting for the telephone confirmation (from the United States and Canada) to establish a joint restriction policy,'' said Garza. Canada on Friday announced a ban on the South American nation's beef and the United States was expected to follow suit.

Mexico, which along with the United States and Canada forms the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), moved on Tuesday with its Central American neighbors to set up border controls that will prohibit a wide range of meat products containing European beef.

Mad Cow disease, also known as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, has pummeled meat markets in Europe as consumers switch to other foods to avoid the disease.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Canada Bans Brazil beef Imports on Mad Cow Fears



NorthJersey.com- Saturday 3 February 2001


OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada, already in a fight with Brazil over jet subsidies, said on Friday it was banning imports of Brazilian canned and liquid beef products due to fears of Mad Cow disease.

``The Government of Canada is taking prudent and reasonable measures today by suspending imports of food products from Brazil which are subject to Canada's policy for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE),'' a government statement said.

Officials told a news conference that the decision was not linked to the aircraft dispute.

The government said it had received information in the past few days calling into question Brazil's controls over potential BSE risks, saying Brazil had imported live animals from Europe until 1999.

Canada also said it was removing the products from store shelves.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - U.S. Bans Brazil beef Imports on Mad Cow Fears

Staff Reporter

Lycos- Saturday 3 February 2001


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States on Friday followed Canada's lead in temporarily suspending imports of Brazilian processed beef products due to Mad Cow concerns.

"This decision is a temporary action pending the release of requested data to complete a Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) risk assessment," the U.S. Agriculture Department said in a statement.

The USDA said although there was no evidence of BSE in Brazil, it would take additional actions if necessary to prevent the brain-wasting disease from entering the United States.

The human form of Mad Cow disease, a new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, has killed more than 80 people who ate the infected beef.

Canada was the first NAFTA country to announce it was banning Brazilian canned and liquid beef products after receiving information questioning Brazil's controls against Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) -- better known as Mad Cow disease. Canada said Brazil had imported live animals from Europe until 1999.

Brazil's Agriculture Ministry on Friday said the ban was "scientifically unjustifiable" since there were never any cases of the brain-wasting illness reported in the country.

BSE has never been detected in the United States, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department and the Food and Drug Administration.


03 Feb 01 - CJD - Germany's Mad Cow laboratory

By Peter Morgan in Riems Island, Germany

BBC- Saturday 3 February 2001


If you trace your finger along the map of Germany's ragged coastline, you will, if you look closely enough, find Riems Island, deep inside what was the old East.

But you would not be allowed to visit this remote corner of re-unified Germany. But I was allowed access.

This is a place that has been sealed off from the public for the best part of a century.

A steel gate and television equipment guard the only access road, high fences and razor wire prevent approach by sea.

The fortifications keep anything from outside getting in - but more importantly they prevent anything from inside getting out.

Riems Island is a laboratory where animal viruses and diseases are investigated.

And now it is to be the epicentre of Germany's research into BSE - deadly in cattle and, it transpires, in humans too.

The shock for me was how candid the scientists were about their ignorance of a disease that has terrified Germans since it was found in the national herd for the first time last year.

I asked them:

"Has the link between BSE and CJD in humans been proved to your own satisfaction yet?"

"No I don't think we can say that it has."

"Do we know how BSE arrived in Germany which has long had strict controls on the standard of its animal feed?"

"No I am afraid we don't."

"How far are we from a vaccination or a cure?"

"Oh many years."

"Is the milk of BSE infected cattle dangerous?"

"We don't think so, but no one can say for certain."

Economic consequences

But of course the scientists are not to blame for the fact that so little research has so far been done on BSE.

The work has got to start somewhere, and this seems as good a place as any. And this is not just a matter of pressing public health concern.

The economic consequences of the BSE crisis are suddenly becoming as apparent in Germany as they are already in Britain and France.

The extermination of 400,000 cattle has just begun here.

And this in a country where the government was assuring the general public there was no BSE as recently as November.

The farmers are stunned, and angry. But so are many others.

I visited an enormous sausage factory just 48 hours after its shocked staff had been told the plant is to close, and their jobs will be lost.

Already the majority of the factory plant was standing idle.

Sales of beef and any products suspected of containing beef have fallen by half 80% in some places.

As I passed by my local steak house last night, I noticed there were absolutely no customers, and that a large poster had been pasted to the window desperately proclaiming: "We sell pork, turkey and fish as well".

Of course the BSE crisis has a political dimension too. In Germany two ministers have been forced to resign, but this has only gone some way to diluting anger against the government.

There cannot be a person in meat-loving, health-obsessed Germany who does not wish the scientists locked away on distant Riems island swift and significant success with their secret endeavours.